Marco Polo

I had gone to the church during the week one morning.  I went inside and sat down, and Ben and Will were both there, along with some three sided boards that were talking about how to overcome obstacles.  Ben slipped and fell.  He got up, but Will helped him out to make sure, and he told us to look at the boards.  I realized just then that the entire church had been flipped backwards, so the “front” with the altar and cross were now in the “back”.  Even the kneeling rail had been moved and the pews were facing the wrong way.

I looked more closely on the boards, and one of them was talking about fear of cemeteries. Becky was there and said I needed to read that one, and we laughed.  There were three possible solutions for each obstacle/fear, and one was always silly.  For example, the first option for how to deal with a  fear of cemeteries was to scream shrilly.  Unfortunately, I don’t remember what the other two were.

We went outside then and Ben and Will had rejoined us.  We were walking around outside, and I noticed ground had been churned up.  It wasn’t clear why, and I thought to myself that people might think it was new graves being dug, or they might think that we were already breaking ground on the new church.  Either way though, I didn’t like that it had been dug up.

We continued to walk around, and I was walking with Ben.  We linked arms, and suddenly we heard a child’s voice call out “Marco!” and Ben replied “Polo!” and a huge group of kids who had been playing on the playground started running over to try to find us.  I whispered to Ben, “What kind of a service is this?  Is this church, or Sunday school?”  I had my eyes open, and then realized that perhaps that was making it too easy to avoid being caught by the kids, and I couldn’t remember if all players were supposed to have their eyes closed, or just the ones calling “Marco”.  The children didn’t call Marco a second time – they were only catching people based on other noises – the sound of footsteps, laughter, or  other noises.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s